Capacity Building
Early Warning & Risk Analysis
Conflict Transformation
Asia
South America
Dennis Taenzler, adelphi

The role of adaptation in climate diplomacy efforts has gained some political attention. “To adapt to climate change in a conflict-sensitive manner” is considered an “important task for 21st century foreign services” as the EU Foreign Affairs Council stated earlier this year in its June Council Conclusions. ECC Newsletter focused already in its last edition on the important role climate change adaptation plays in South Asia. In a report on behalf of the German Federal Environment Agency, adelphi now analyses the linkage between adaptation, peace and stability.

The main objective of this report is to outline the potential contribution of adaptation measures to avoid crises and conflicts caused or exacerbated by water scarcity, food shortages or extreme weather events. As part of the conceptual framework we show how adaptation may contribute to peace and stability even in conflict-prone areas given that a conflict-sensitive approach is applied. On the basis of a comprehensive regional analysis, we illustrate that adaptation is not yet a prominent element of regional cooperation. To address this gap, we suggest three regional adaptation roadmaps for the Andes region, Central and South Asia based on desk review of regional processes and programmes as well as expert consultations. By using entry points for regional cooperation, adaptation can not only be mainstreamed but also help to further contribute to regional identities and stability.

To ensure that the results can be considered in national and international policy processes and to strengthen international governance for adaptation, we close the report with a “Memorandum for Action on Adaptation for Peace and Stability” outlining major principles to support processes for adaptation and peace. Such principles are, for example, the establishment of peace and conflict assessments for adaptation programmes, the mainstreaming of climate change adaptation in conflict-prone contexts, applying conflict sensitive approaches or provisions to ensure participatory processes to design and implement adaptation measures. With this report, we also hope to offer some ideas how to further develop a climate diplomacy toolbox that complements on-going activities as part of the international climate negotiations.

Source:
Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
Martin Wall, adelphi

The climate diplomacy podcast gives insights to current topics in international climate diplomacy. Host Martin Wall interviews authors of recent publications or experts on their take of what needs to be done to promote climate foreign policy. In the latest Climate Diplomacy Podcast he interviews Daria Ivleva, one of the editors of adelphi's recently publication on foreign policy and the SDGs.

Climate Diplomacy
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Stella Schaller, adelphi

The challenges facing the international community are growing while the willingness to cooperate seems to be waning. Foreign policy must help bridge this gap. One way to accomplish this is by pushing forward a major achievement of multilateralism: the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals. At a side event during the 2019 High-Level Political Forum, diplomats and policy experts discussed the role of foreign policy in the global sustainability architecture.

Climate Diplomacy
Development
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Stella Schaller, adelphi

Global progress towards achieving the SDGs is slow, and for many targets, off track. While SDG implementation is primarily a national task and responsibility, it also requires concerted international cooperation. Two arguments why foreign policy could play an important role in their achievement are presented here.

Adaptation & Resilience
Capacity Building
Conflict Transformation
Development
Security
Global Issues
Martin Ras, UNDP

Natural hazards hit all countries but people living in least developed countries and fragile states, often affected by conflict, feel them most severely. According to the Overseas Development Institute, between 2004 and 2014, 58 percent of all deaths from disasters occurred in the 30 most fragile states.