Capacity Building
Early Warning & Risk Analysis
Conflict Transformation
Asia
South America
Dennis Taenzler, adelphi

The role of adaptation in climate diplomacy efforts has gained some political attention. “To adapt to climate change in a conflict-sensitive manner” is considered an “important task for 21st century foreign services” as the EU Foreign Affairs Council stated earlier this year in its June Council Conclusions. ECC Newsletter focused already in its last edition on the important role climate change adaptation plays in South Asia. In a report on behalf of the German Federal Environment Agency, adelphi now analyses the linkage between adaptation, peace and stability.

The main objective of this report is to outline the potential contribution of adaptation measures to avoid crises and conflicts caused or exacerbated by water scarcity, food shortages or extreme weather events. As part of the conceptual framework we show how adaptation may contribute to peace and stability even in conflict-prone areas given that a conflict-sensitive approach is applied. On the basis of a comprehensive regional analysis, we illustrate that adaptation is not yet a prominent element of regional cooperation. To address this gap, we suggest three regional adaptation roadmaps for the Andes region, Central and South Asia based on desk review of regional processes and programmes as well as expert consultations. By using entry points for regional cooperation, adaptation can not only be mainstreamed but also help to further contribute to regional identities and stability.

To ensure that the results can be considered in national and international policy processes and to strengthen international governance for adaptation, we close the report with a “Memorandum for Action on Adaptation for Peace and Stability” outlining major principles to support processes for adaptation and peace. Such principles are, for example, the establishment of peace and conflict assessments for adaptation programmes, the mainstreaming of climate change adaptation in conflict-prone contexts, applying conflict sensitive approaches or provisions to ensure participatory processes to design and implement adaptation measures. With this report, we also hope to offer some ideas how to further develop a climate diplomacy toolbox that complements on-going activities as part of the international climate negotiations.

Source:
Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
Dennis Tänzler, adelphi
It’s crunch time for the global climate security discourse. While the COVID-19 crisis remains the key present challenge, it’s time to take stock of where the debate stands on the security implications of climate change in the run-up to another debate in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) scheduled for July 2020. The Berlin Climate Security Conference series initiated a year ago with a call for action complements the UNSC debate...
Conflict Transformation
Global Issues
adelphi

New report for policymakers provides an overview of the growing research on the links between climate change, security and peace. The synthesis identifies ten insights into climate-related security risks and lays the groundwork for the Global Climate Security Risk and Foresight Assessment, led by adelphi and PIK, that will be launched at the Berlin Climate and Security Conference.

Ariana Barrenechea, Sophia Christina Tomany and Teslin Maria Augustine, with contributions from Abhishek Raj, John Chrysostom Kamoga, Nadja Macherey, Sonia Ran and Varad Vatsal (Willy Brandt School of Public Policy, University of Erfurt)

In the wake of Germany’s United Nations Security Council (UNSC) presidency for the month of July 2020, its role in addressing climate change in the body gains even greater importance. A look into selected UNSC members that are also pushing the climate issue reveals: health and economic risks are key entry-points.

Dhanasree Jayaram, MAHE

It’s official: India has been elected as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for 2021-22. Previously, the country has adopted a cautionary approach towards climate security. While it may not significantly shift its positions, global realities may trigger more openness, with an eye on multilateralism, rule of law and fairness.