Slovak EU Council Presidency
The High-Level Segment of the 28th Meeting of Parties to the Montreal Protocol was officially opened on October 13, 2016 in Kigali, Rwanda. Over 1000 delegates from 197 countries are attending the meeting which is discussing an ambitious amendment to the Protocol to phase out high-global warming potential Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)| Photo credit: Rwanda Environment Management Authority REMA/flickr.com [CC BY-ND 2.0]
Kigali, 15 October 2016

The adoption of the Appendix to the Montreal Protocol on reducing fluorinated greenhouse gases (HFC) successfully concluded the 28th meeting of the parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (10–14 October 2016, Kigali, Rwanda). The Slovak delegation led by the Slovak Minister for the Environment, László Sólymos, conducted the negotiations on behalf of the EU.

The minister considers the Montreal Protocol to be the most successful global environment agreement, which has made a substantial contribution to the recovery of the ozone layer by reducing the production and consumption of freons. ‘On the other hand, some fluorinated greenhouse gases (HFC) that have replaced freons substantially contribute to global warming. Today, we have a great opportunity and responsibility to commit to specific objectives which will lead to the gradual reduction of HFC production and their replacement by energy-efficient and climate-friendly alternatives,’ said László Sólymos.

The negotiations resulted in the adoption of the Appendix to the Montreal Protocol, the implementation of which will contribute to reducing the increase in global temperature by 0.5 °C, which was agreed this April in Geneva. The Appendix is therefore one of the first concrete steps to fulfilment of the objectives set out in the Paris Agreement ratified by the EU last week.

[This article originally appeared on the website of the Slovak EU Council Presidency, www.eu2016.sk]

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