Civil Society
Climate Change
Conflict Transformation
South America
Alex Pashley

Colombia became South America’s first country to submit its contribution to a UN global warming pact, setting out how it will slash greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to extreme weather.

The pledge outlined a 20% cut to greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 from a business as usual projection. That could rise to 30%, conditional on international cash to aid the mitigation effort.

But it warned the end of decades-long conflict, while welcome, could bring increased pressure to clear forests, jeopardising climate goals.

In its communication to the UN, the government said it had considered the “potential impacts” of “post conflict scenarios in different regions”.

“In the past, peace processes elsewhere in the world have been associated to negative impacts on the environment, due to, among other things, migration patterns that increase pressure on natural resources in the most vulnerable areas, often resulting in increased deforestation.”

But its climate strategy, such as better use of water resources, had “the potential to facilitate the consolidation of peace territories,” it said.

 

For the complete article, please see RTCC.

Source:
RTCC

Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
Dennis Tänzler (adelphi)

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous parallels have been drawn between this health crisis and the climate crisis. Science plays an important role in advising decision makers on how to ensure sustainable crisis management and a precautionary approach to avoid harmful repercussions, particularly where we do not yet know all the consequences of our actions. [...]

Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Noah Gordon, Daria Ivleva and Emily Wright, adelphi

Decarbonisation won’t come as fast as the pandemic. But if fossil fuel exporters are not prepared for it, they will face an enduring crisis. The EU can help. 

Adriana Erthal Abdenur, Igarapé Institute

Stories of clear skies and wildlife conquering urban areas might provide much needed comfort during these uncertain times as the health crisis unfolds. But in Brazil, where climate and environmental issues already lack attention and resources, the pandemic underscores the next crisis.

Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
Dhanasree Jayaram, MAHE

Solutions to the current COVID-19 crisis need to be aligned to those of the climate crisis for a global transformation towards more sustainability, resilience, equity, and justice. Climate diplomacy has the tools to achieve these objectives simultaneously.