Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
adelphi
Guterres, UNGA, multilateralism
Secretary-General António Guterres makes remarks at the annual parliamentary hearing on "Emerging Challenges to Multilateralism: A Parliamentary Response", February 2019 | © UN Photo/Loey Felipe

Strengthening multilateralism is a prominent task of foreign policy and central to achieving sustainable development and securing a peaceful future. Here you can watch, hear and read innovative ideas on how diplomats can drive transformative change by gearing-up international cooperation, shaping a truly sustainable foreign policy.

Video Statements

Susanne Baumann, Federal Government Commissioner for Disarmament and Arms Control and Head of the Directorate-General for International Order, the United Nations and Arms Control at the German Federal Foreign Office, gives examples of how German foreign policy works to achieve the SDGs, a unique compass for holistic foreign policy thinking:

For Oli Brown, Associate Fellow at Chatham House, foreign policy is essential to achieving sustainable development because it has the tools and the mandate to give vigorous support to multilateralism:

Climate Diplomacy Podcast

Foreign Affairs and the Agenda 2030: Progress on many of the 2030 Agenda’s  17 Sustainable Development Goals is lagging while the willingness to cooperate internationally seems to be waning. Martin Wall discusses how foreign policy can help bridge this gap with Daria Ivleva, one of the editors of adelphi’s recent publication Driving Transformative Change: Foreign Affairs and the Agenda 2030.

Blogs and Publications

Stopping the Great Splintering: A 5-Step Plan to Revive Multilateralism, a blog article by Oli Brown, breaks down what can be done to bring back some of the 2015 charm.

Leadership for the SDGs: Why foreign policy must recharge multilateral cooperation now, an essay by Oli Brown and Stella Schaller, reminds us that the SDGs and foreign policy seek to achieve the same things – stability, peace and prosperity on a healthy planet. Therefore, strengthening the multilateral structures to deliver the goals should be seen as a litmus test for the effectiveness of foreign policy in the twenty-first century.

Beware the politics: Leveraging foreign policy for SDG implementation, an essay by Daria Ivleva, Alexander Müller and Benjamin Pohl, claims that sustainable foreign policy needs to be aware of the (geo)political dimension of the 2030 Agenda. It also needs to prioritise sustainability: if the SDGs remain only a side note to multiple other imperatives of foreign affairs, this would imply significant risks and foregone opportunities.

For more essays on foreign policy and sustainable development, take a look at the volume Driving Transformative Change: Foreign Affairs and the 2030 Agenda.

Diplomacy for Sustainability: Past Events

In this video, we have put together some of the best moments of the panel discussion at the German Federal Foreign Office on the role of foreign policy in the global sustainability architecture:

The challenges facing the international community are growing while the willingness to cooperate seems to be waning. At a side event during the 2019 High-Level Political Forum, diplomats and policy experts discussed the role of foreign policy in the architecture of global sustainability.


Climate Diplomacy
Europe
Sam Morgan, EURACTIV

Russia’s economic development minister warned last week that the EU’s plans to deploy a carbon tax at the bloc’s borders will not be in line with World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules, just as Brussels doubled down on the idea of green tariffs.

Paul Joffe

The pandemic and racial justice protests call for justice and crisis preparedness – an opportunity also to act on climate change. Successfully taking advantage of this momentum, however, requires a climate strategy that ensures everyone has a voice and a stake. Here, Paul Joffe builds on a previous correspondence about how to begin that effort in this time of crisis.

Water
Asia
Scott Moore, New Security Beat

Few places have suffered more from the COVID-19 pandemic than southern China, the region where the novel coronavirus was first detected in the city of Wuhan. But it turned out that the pandemic is not the only calamity to befall south China this year. The region has been inundated by heavy rainfall since late May, creating a risk of catastrophic flooding.

Climate Change
Global Issues
Manon Levrey, EPLO

Natural resources-based conflicts are sometimes made complex by non-climate push and pull factors, like unemployment and political tension. These factors should be taken into account when developing and implementing a peacebuilding strategy, making sure all stakeholders are at the table – including those fueling the conflict. The online workshop ‘Integrating peacebuilding and climate change mitigation efforts in natural resource management’, organised by the European Peacebuilding Liaison Office (EPLO) and adelphi, looked into this complex issue.