Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
Security
North America
Nicholas Kusnetz, Inside Climate News

The report, requested by the US Congress in 2017, drew sharp criticism for being too thin on details and failing to show which bases are most at risk across the military.

Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
Environment & Migration
South America
Central America & Caribbean
Adriana Erthal Abdenur, Igarapé Institute

In some areas of the world, including Central America, rising sea levels and declining agricultural productivity due to climate change are expected to trigger major migratory flows, especially within countries. The role of policy-makers is it to promote local solutions while engaging in regional cooperation for a preventative approach.

Adaptation & Resilience
Capacity Building
Climate Change
Sub-Saharan Africa
Central America & Caribbean
Middle East & North Africa
Asia
Josh Busby, Ashley Moran (UT Austin) and Clionadh Raleigh (ACLED)

A new USAID report focuses on the intersection of climate exposure and state fragility worldwide. It finds that the factors that make a country vulberable to large-scale conflict are similar to those that make it vulnerable to climate change. The report thus offers a way for global audiences with an interest in climate and security to identify places of high concern.

Adaptation & Resilience
Capacity Building
Climate Change
Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
North America
Claire Stam, Euractiv

San Francisco’s Global Climate Action Summit ended on 14 September with non-state actors sending a call to action to governments ahead of the crucial COP24 in December, while highlighting their pivotal role in reducing emissions and reaching climate targets.

Adaptation & Resilience
Civil Society
Climate Change
Technology & Innovation
North America
Marianne Lavelle, InsideClimate News

After an 18-month stretch without a White House science adviser – the longest any modern president has gone without a science adviser – Trump appoints extreme weather expert Kelvin Droegemeier to the post. Kelvin Droegemeier is vice president for research at the University of Oklahoma and a climate change scientist. His selection was widely welcomed.

Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
Early Warning & Risk Analysis
Global Issues
North America
Sabrina Shankman, Inside Climate News

As global temperatures rise, warmer air and oceans are expected to fuel stronger hurricanes, with dangerous consequences.

Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
Early Warning & Risk Analysis
North America
Aubrey Paris, ISGP

One of the most pressing—and distressing—climate change impacts faced by the world is storm surge, a storm-induced increase in water level exceeding normal, tidal levels. Storm surge is becoming more of a threat to coastal communities due to rising sea levels, since higher sea levels mean higher “normal, tidal levels” before surge even occurs. Affected communities face risks to their homes, infrastructure, and livelihoods, but what can we do about the problem, aside from abandoning coastal communities altogether?

Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
South America
Guy Edwards, Climate Home

Facing an enormous clean-up job, Peru must think about a future where flood like those in March become ever more common. In the wake of powerful rains that led to devastating floods and mudslides, Peru’s president Pedro Pablo Kuczynski says the country should expect more such devastating weather events.

Adaptation & Resilience
Cities
Climate Change
Early Warning & Risk Analysis
North America
Cynthia Rosenzweig and William Solecki, Guest Writers

We live in an urbanizing world. Up to two-thirds of the world’s population – some six billion people – may live in cities by 2050.

Cities have emerged as first responders to climate change because they experience the impacts of natural disasters firsthand and because they produce up to 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions.

Adaptation & Resilience
Biodiversity & Livelihoods
Climate Change
Development
Sub-Saharan Africa
South America
Global Issues
Asia
Andrew Taber, New Security Beat
Chichaucancha1

Over the past decade, the number of undernourished people around the world has declined by around 167 million, to just under 800 million people. However, this positive trend glosses over a stark reality: Food insecurity is increasing in the world’s mountains. This pattern has been under-recognized by development experts and governments, a dangerous oversight with far-reaching social and environmental repercussions.

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