Biodiversity & Livelihoods
Capacity Building
Cities
Asia
Gianna Gayle Herrera Amul and Maxim Shrestha, RSIS Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies

Cities need to be recognized, increasingly more so for their role in implementing necessary and timely action to address the impacts of climate change where it matters – at the local level. With majority of the global population living in urban environments, cities are major sources of carbon emissions as well as highly vulnerable to climate impacts. The involvement and participation of cities and urban localities are therefore important and required in terms of both climate adaptation and mitigation efforts.

Biodiversity & Livelihoods
Early Warning & Risk Analysis
Land & Food
Minerals & Mining
Private Sector
Asia
Dr. Will Rifkin, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, Australia

The impact on farmers of drought exacerbated by climate change can be mitigated by aspects of certain forms of resource extraction.  However, the Australian experience suggests that such measures involve trade-offs.  These trade-offs illustrate how our energy choices are becoming increasingly com

Gender
Global Issues
Diego Arguedas Ortiz

Despite international acknowledgement that women are disproportionately affected by climate change, the Lima climate negotiations have been slow to deliver progress on recognising their importance, while threats of pushback loom on the horizon.

Capacity Building
Gender
Global Issues
Maria Prebble

Last month, more than 10,000 negotiators from 189 countries attended the latest UN climate change conference, known as the 19th Conference of the Parties, or COP-19, this year held in Warsaw.

Biodiversity & Livelihoods
Climate Change
Asia
Jacob Glass, Interview with Saleemul Huq

When it comes to climate change vulnerability, it sometimes seems as if all eyes are on Bangladesh.

Biodiversity & Livelihoods
Global Issues
Michael Conathan

The filibuster has gone international.

Biodiversity & Livelihoods
Energy

Moscow, 14 August 2012 — Environmental activists warned Tuesday that drilling for oil in the Russian Arctic could have disastrous consequences because of a lack of technology and infrastructure to deal with a possible spill in a remote region with massive icebergs and heavy storms.

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