Climate Change
Energy
Global Issues
Jan Burck, Ursula Hagen, Franziska Marten, Niklas Höhne and Christoph Bals
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The Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) is an independent monitoring tool of countries' climate protection performances. It compares climate protection efforts and progresses made by individual countries. Up until now, no country has made it to one of the top three categories.

Next to the new report, there is a comprehensive website, which features an interactive tool showing the results for all 56 countries and the EU.

The position of a country in the ranking is defined by its performance regarding 14 indicators within the three categories “GHG Emissions”, “Renewable Energy” and “Energy Use”. Additionally, the category “Climate Policy” evaluates the progress made by nations in implementing the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change.

The CCPI 2019 results illustrate the main regional differences in climate protection and performance within the 56 evaluated countries and the EU. The overall results show that countries such as the US and Russia are furthest behind.

No country performed well enough to reach „very good”, meaning that no country has yet made it to one of the top categories.

In this year’s assessment, Sweden leads the ranking, followed by Morocco and Lithuania. Russia, Canada, Australia and South Korea all score badly in the 2019 CCPI ranking, with the US just one place off the bottom spot.

The UK and the EU as a whole score reasonably well in the index, but the CCPI experts issue several caveats and leave the top three places in the league table blank. “This is because no country has yet done enough in terms of consistent performance across all the indicators required to limit global warming to well below 2°C, as agreed in the Paris Agreement,” they said.

The CCPI is published by Germanwatch, the NewClimate Institute and the Climate Action Network, with the help of around 350 independent energy and climate experts.

 

The information provided here originally appeared on the CCPI-Website and in this article by Climate News Network.

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