Climate Change
Security
Global Issues
adelphi

As the links between the climate crisis and risks to global peace and prosperity become ever more evident, foreign policy actors are increasingly under pressure to step up their efforts to address climate-related risks. To increase the momentum for addressing climate-related drivers of conflict, the German Federal Foreign Office in partnership with adelphi and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) hosted the Berlin Climate and Security Conference (BCSC) at the German Federal Foreign Office on 4 June 2019.

Climate Diplomacy
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Daria Ivleva (adelphi), Alexander Müller (TMG Think Tank for Sustainability) and Benjamin Pohl (adelphi)
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The adoption of the 2030 Agenda in 2015 marked a high point for international multilateral cooperation. With its 17 goals and 169 targets, the implementation process for the SDGs may appear an essentially technocratic exercise. Yet in view of the social transformation that it seeks to bring about across key dimensions of human civilisation, SDG implementation remains a profoundly political process. Because of the intense political implications, in-depth analysis, political foresight and strategic guidance are needed. As the consequences of SDG implementation cross and transcend borders and impact international relations, foreign policy has a critical role to play.

Climate Diplomacy
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Oli Brown (Chatham House) and Stella Schaller (adelphi)
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The SDGs set out a powerful vision for a better world, but action since 2015 is not delivering that promise. Foreign policy practitioners are in a unique position to help advocate for and assist in the implementation of the SDGs. Given that the SDGs and foreign policy want to achieve the same things – stability, peace and prosperity on a healthy planet – delivering them should be seen as a litmus test for the effectiveness of foreign policy in the twenty-first century.

Climate Change
Climate Diplomacy
Conflict Transformation
Environment & Migration
Security
Global Issues
Berlin Climate Security Conference
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Berlin Call for Action 04 June 2019

There is increasing evidence that climate change is undermining livelihoods, food and water security in rural and urban areas around the world, thereby acting as a “threat multiplier” in fragile and conflict-prone situations. In light of this, the Berlin Climate and Security Conference, which took place at the German Federal Foreign Office on 4 June 2019, aimed at increasing the momentum for decisive action to address climate-related drivers of conflict.

Civil Society
Climate Change
Conflict Transformation
Energy
Environment & Migration
Gender
Water
Global Issues
Peace Science Digest

For researchers looking into global security dynamics, it is becoming increasingly difficult to overlook climate change as a threat multiplier in conflict situations. While climate change may not directly cause conflict, it may be inextricably woven into pre-existing conflicts of power, ethnicity, and economic interest. Understading the role of climate-related impacts on security is therefore crucial for global peace.

Climate Diplomacy
Security
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
David Steven, (Center on International Cooperation, NYU), Rachel Locke (Center on International Cooperation, NYU) and Lukas Rüttinger (adelphi)
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The foreign policy community faces a choice. It can continue to allow unacceptable levels of violence and conflict to undermine individual countries and the global order. Or it can build a new consensus that violence is a preventable epidemic. This would take seriously a growing body of evidence showing what is most likely to work to steer the world back toward global peace, resilient societies, and more sustainable prosperity.

Climate Diplomacy
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Clare Church (IISD), Alec Crawford (IISD) and Stella Schaller (adelphi)
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Every change, no matter how small, can cause larger changes elsewhere. The radical socio-ecological transformation envisioned under the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires anticipating and managing trade-offs, and the diplomatic cadre will have a significant role to play in maximising synergies, mitigating adverse knock-on consequences and developing strategies for mutual benefit.

Adaptation & Resilience
Climate Change
Climate Diplomacy
Private Sector
Global Issues
Alec Crawford and Claire Church, IISD

The strategic and well-informed inclusion of the private sector in climate change adaptation planning and activities must be a key part of all countries’ efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change; they will be key partners in the design, financing and implementation of adaptation priorities. This study aims to offer guidance to governments and their partners on how to engage the private sector in the NAP process.

Adrian Foong and Stella Schaller (adelphi)
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Event summary 30 April 2019 - DRIVING TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE - Foreign Affairs and SDGs

The implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development can prevent conflict and safeguard global stability – and, as a new study from adelphi shows, foreign policy has a critical role to play.

Development
Security
Sustainable Transformation
Global Issues
Sara Batmanglich (OECD), Pietro Bertazzi (CDP), Oli Brown (Chatham House), Clare Church and Alec Crawford (IISD), Rachel Locke and David Steven (Center of International Cooperation, NYU), Alexander Müller (TMG Think Tank for Sustainability), Alexander Carius, Bibiana Garcia, Daria Ivleva, Benno Keppner, Benjamin Pohl, Lukas Rüttinger and Stella Schaller (adelphi)

The challenges facing the international community are growing while the willingness to cooperate seems to be waning and unilateral action at times gets in the way of joint solutions. Foreign policy can pave the way for transformative change by actively supporting a major achievement of multilateralism: the 2030 Agenda with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These goals have a common aim: more peace and justice worldwide. But what exactly is the role of foreign policy in the global sustainability architecture? What are the fields of engagement and tools of a new "Diplomacy for Sustainability"?

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