Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
adelphi
Guterres, UNGA, multilateralism
Secretary-General António Guterres makes remarks at the annual parliamentary hearing on "Emerging Challenges to Multilateralism: A Parliamentary Response", February 2019 | © UN Photo/Loey Felipe

Strengthening multilateralism is a prominent task of foreign policy and central to achieving sustainable development and securing a peaceful future. Here you can watch, hear and read innovative ideas on how diplomats can drive transformative change by gearing-up international cooperation, shaping a truly sustainable foreign policy.

Video Statements

Susanne Baumann, Federal Government Commissioner for Disarmament and Arms Control and Head of the Directorate-General for International Order, the United Nations and Arms Control at the German Federal Foreign Office, gives examples of how German foreign policy works to achieve the SDGs, a unique compass for holistic foreign policy thinking:

For Oli Brown, Associate Fellow at Chatham House, foreign policy is essential to achieving sustainable development because it has the tools and the mandate to give vigorous support to multilateralism:

Climate Diplomacy Podcast

Foreign Affairs and the Agenda 2030: Progress on many of the 2030 Agenda’s  17 Sustainable Development Goals is lagging while the willingness to cooperate internationally seems to be waning. Martin Wall discusses how foreign policy can help bridge this gap with Daria Ivleva, one of the editors of adelphi’s recent publication Driving Transformative Change: Foreign Affairs and the Agenda 2030.

Blogs and Publications

Stopping the Great Splintering: A 5-Step Plan to Revive Multilateralism, a blog article by Oli Brown, breaks down what can be done to bring back some of the 2015 charm.

Leadership for the SDGs: Why foreign policy must recharge multilateral cooperation now, an essay by Oli Brown and Stella Schaller, reminds us that the SDGs and foreign policy seek to achieve the same things – stability, peace and prosperity on a healthy planet. Therefore, strengthening the multilateral structures to deliver the goals should be seen as a litmus test for the effectiveness of foreign policy in the twenty-first century.

Beware the politics: Leveraging foreign policy for SDG implementation, an essay by Daria Ivleva, Alexander Müller and Benjamin Pohl, claims that sustainable foreign policy needs to be aware of the (geo)political dimension of the 2030 Agenda. It also needs to prioritise sustainability: if the SDGs remain only a side note to multiple other imperatives of foreign affairs, this would imply significant risks and foregone opportunities.

For more essays on foreign policy and sustainable development, take a look at the volume Driving Transformative Change: Foreign Affairs and the 2030 Agenda.

Diplomacy for Sustainability: Past Events

In this video, we have put together some of the best moments of the panel discussion at the German Federal Foreign Office on the role of foreign policy in the global sustainability architecture:

The challenges facing the international community are growing while the willingness to cooperate seems to be waning. At a side event during the 2019 High-Level Political Forum, diplomats and policy experts discussed the role of foreign policy in the architecture of global sustainability.


Climate Diplomacy
Global Issues
Dennis Tänzler, adelphi
It’s crunch time for the global climate security discourse. While the COVID-19 crisis remains the key present challenge, it’s time to take stock of where the debate stands on the security implications of climate change in the run-up to another debate in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) scheduled for July 2020. The Berlin Climate Security Conference series initiated a year ago with a call for action complements the UNSC debate...
Conflict Transformation
Global Issues
adelphi

New report for policymakers provides an overview of the growing research on the links between climate change, security and peace. The synthesis identifies ten insights into climate-related security risks and lays the groundwork for the Global Climate Security Risk and Foresight Assessment, led by adelphi and PIK, that will be launched at the Berlin Climate and Security Conference.

Ariana Barrenechea, Sophia Christina Tomany and Teslin Maria Augustine, with contributions from Abhishek Raj, John Chrysostom Kamoga, Nadja Macherey, Sonia Ran and Varad Vatsal (Willy Brandt School of Public Policy, University of Erfurt)

In the wake of Germany’s United Nations Security Council (UNSC) presidency for the month of July 2020, its role in addressing climate change in the body gains even greater importance. A look into selected UNSC members that are also pushing the climate issue reveals: health and economic risks are key entry-points.

Dhanasree Jayaram, MAHE

It’s official: India has been elected as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for 2021-22. Previously, the country has adopted a cautionary approach towards climate security. While it may not significantly shift its positions, global realities may trigger more openness, with an eye on multilateralism, rule of law and fairness.